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OWNER OPERATOR BUSINESS EXPENSES

CDL Cost and Owner Operator Expenses and Revenue

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Operations Evening Light and Eagle Claw, A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy (August 1977 to February 1983)

Operation Evening Light And Eagle Claw  A Sailors tale of his Tour of duty in the U.S. Navy ISBN NO. 978-1-4276-0454-5

CDL Cost – CDL Training Costs Explained…

Posted by Aidan

 

The cost of acquiring a commercial driver’s license varies depending on the type of CDL training you go through. Below we provide rough estimates of CDL costs based on a number of different scenarios:

 

Scenario 1: You want to be a commercial truck driver and want to work for a large trucking company.

 

In this case you’ll no doubt be able to get your CDL completely free of charge by doing your training through an established trucking company. Many trucking companies have arrangements with CDL training schools and provided you agree to work for the trucking company for a period of time after completing your training, they’ll cover all the expenses involved with getting a commercial license and even pay you while you train.

 

Another benefit of doing your CDL training with an established trucking company is that they’ll often provide the trucks from you to train in and perform your on road test in.

 

Scenario 2: You don’t want to do your CDL training with a trucking company.

In this scenario the CDL cost will vary a little from state to state. As a general rule you can expect to pay the following:

 

Medical Examination Fee – varies a lot from practitioner to practitioner.

Application Fee – around $15 – $25

Skills Test Fee – around $60 – $70 if you provide the vehicle

License Fee – around $50

Additional Endorsements – around $10 each

A CDL usually needs to be renewed every few years (varies from state to state). A typical renewal period is around 4-6 years and the renewal cost is around $50 – $100.

http://joinswift.com/landing-pages/student/yahoobing-lp

 

Commercial Driver's License Program

 

Overview

Driving a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) requires a higher level of knowledge, experience, skills, and physical abilities than that required to drive a non-commercial vehicle. In order to obtain a Commercial Driver's License (CDL), an applicant must pass both skills and knowledge testing geared to these higher standards. Additionally CDL holders are held to a higher standard when operating any type of motor vehicle on public roads. Serious traffic violations committed by a CDL holder can affect their ability to maintain their CDL certification.

Licensing

 

Driving a commercial motor vehicle is a big responsibility. It requires special skills and knowledge. Most drivers must obtain a commercial driver's license (CDL) through their home State (it is illegal to have a license from more than one State). In addition, special endorsements may be required if you or your company drivers will be driving any of the following vehicles:

 

a truck with double or triple trailers

a truck with a tank

a truck carrying hazardous materials

a passenger vehicle

Contact your State licensing bureau (e.g., Department of Motor Vehicles) for details.

 

Highlights

 

How Do I Get a Commercial Driver's License?

Driver Resources

State and Local Government Resources

 

What's New?

 

FMCSA Announces a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on a Drug and Alcohol       

Database

 

Military Skills Test Waiver Status Map (PDF)

 

FMCSA Publishes Final Rule (FR) Modifying Seven Provisions of the May 2011                        FR

 

Reciprocity and Recognition of United States and Canadian Commercial Drivers Licenses

 

Frequently Asked Questions 

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Sign up today to receive email alerts when new Commercial Driver License information is posted to this site.

 

Any summary, description, or paraphrase of a regulatory requirement on this site is intended to provide general guidance only.  Please consult the text of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations for a full account of the applicable requirements.

Updated: Tuesday, July 1, 2014

http://www.fmcsa.dot.gov/registration/commercial-drivers-license

 

Job Descriptions for a Heavy Haul Driver

by Rose Mathews , Demand Media The demand for heavy haul truck drivers is expected to increase.

 

Job Descriptions for Truck Drivers

The Job Description of a Truck Driver Owner Operator

What Is the Difference Between General Job Descriptions & Special-Purpose Job Descriptions?

Long Haul Truck Salary

Short Haul vs. Long Haul Trucking

 

Heavy haul truck drivers transport heavy loads across the country. The demand for these drivers is expected to grow at an above-average pace, with 21 percent more jobs expected in this field from 2010 to 2020. The job doesn't require a college education and the average annual salary for these workers is $37,740, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

 

Job Duties

 

Heavy haul truckers must load and unload cargo into the trailer. Although they're told by their dispatcher where and what time their delivery must be made, it's up to the driver to plan and map the best route. Truck drivers must be familiar with all traffic laws and safety requirements. They must inspect and maintain all equipment, and report any mechanical issues with the truck to their dispatcher. These drivers must have the stamina to stay alert while driving long distances.

 

Work Environment

 

Heavy haul truck driving is physically demanding. Not only must you be strong enough to load and unload cargo, but be also to withstand the demands of driving for long hours without a break. In addition, you must be comfortable being away from home and on the road for days or weeks at a time. Truck drivers must have a high degree of tolerance for solitude, since most work alone for long stretches of time.

 

Training and Certification

 

Some companies require their drivers have a high school diploma or the equivalent. Truck driving schools instruct students how to maneuver large trucks, as well as teaching important traffic and safety laws and regulations, and how they vary by state. Heavy haul drivers require a Commercial Driver’s License, or CDL. The criteria for getting this license varies by state, but usually you must pass both a knowledge test and a driving test.

 

Qualities Required for the Job

 

Truck drivers must have good hand-eye coordination in order to drive effectively. You are tested to ensure you have strong hearing and eyesight. Regulations require that truckers be able to hear a whisper from five feet away without help from a hearing aid. They must be in good physical health, and not have any conditions such as epilepsy, high blood pressure, or any other disease or condition that would prevent them from successfully operating a truck over long distances.

 

logo

 

Now Hiring Student Drivers

 

New CDL Class A Driver Classes Starting Weekly.

 

Earn Your CDL Class A License and Get On The Road to a Successful Truck Driving Career!

 

Jumpstart your trucking career with Swift Transportation. We’ll put you on the fast track to earning a CDL Class A license and a secure future. We have a proud history of training people from all prior careers to become many of the industry’s best and most successful professional truck drivers.

 

You'll be paid while you train with the best trucking mentors in the business. Learn from experienced hands like Jeff Ayers (pictured) who became a Diamond Driver with Swift, part of America’s trucking elite.

 

Now offering Truck Driver Trainee scholarships to U.S. Veterans, National Guard
and Reserve.

 

Take pride in why you drive and start your career at Swift!

 

No Money Down or Credit Check

New Classes Start Weekly

Certified Mentors Ready
and Available

Paid (While Training With Mentor)

Regional and Dedicated Opportunities

Excellent Benefits Package and Perks

Financing Available for Student Housing

Truck Driving for Swift Transportation

 

Take pride in why you drive and start your career at Swift! Truck driving jobs include; Flatbed, Regional, Dedicated, Intermodal, and Over-the-Road opportunities. Take advantage of the many truck driving career opportunities available at Swift.

http://cdltraininghub.com/cdl-cost

 

Advantages and Disadvantages of Being an Owner-Operator

 

Working as an Owner Operator - Owner-operators buy their own equipment and hire out their services to customers. As an owner-operator, you are your own boss and you can pick your own jobs. The owner-operator is a manager, salesman, accountant and driver all rolled into one. Although many people enjoy the freedom of this job, successful self-employment requires self-discipline, determination and drive.

 

Advantages - The great lure of self-employment is the idea that you won't be out there making money for someone else. Every penny you earn is yours, and you can decide how to spend it. Many people think they will never again have a boss, and they can finally say and do whatever they want.

 

To a certain extent, that's true. You can schedule your loads however you like. You can develop your client base around the type of work you like to do. For example, if you really like hauling gravel, then you can specialize in gravel and carry nothing else. If you find a customer you just can't tolerate, you can simply choose not to work with them anymore.

 

Disadvantages - The reality of self-employment is that it's actually several times more work than working for someone else, because you take on all the management jobs in addition to your driving role. Instead of being told where to go, as an owner-operator, you have to find your own work. You will have to let freight companies know you're out there, build relationships, and find ways to stay busy when times get slow.

 

Owning your own equipment can be very expensive: there is the initial cost of buying or leasing the equipment, plus the expense of maintaining your tractor and trailer. You also have to pay for liability and health insurance and set aside money for taxes.

 

Rather than having no boss, the owner-operator's boss is the customer. If you are continuously late or unreliable, you probably won't have work for very long. Although you can pick and choose your loads, there are plenty of times when there is very little freight and you may need to take whatever you can get, which could be a schedule or a type of freight you don't like. Often, new work comes from the type of work you already have, so the few jobs you take on out of desperation can become the mainstay of your business, because you need work and that's what's there.

 

Although you can stop working for customers you don't like, at some point you will run out of customers.

 

Did you know:

 

Some owner operators use computer-based systems to find loads to carry that match their desired schedule.

 

Some large national freight carriers only work with independent owner-operators and maintain no fleet of their own.

 

Personality Traits

 

Successful owner-operators are usually good at working with people. If you have strong organizational skills, are good at planning, and are able to manage money well, then you may have the right personality type to work as an owner-operator.

 

Getting Equipment

 

In order to start working as an owner-operator, you'll need to acquire a rig. Many owners start off with just a tractor and eventually build up to a fleet that may include several tractors, trailers and flatbeds.

 

Buying a tractor is a bigger investment than a car, and almost as expensive as a house, depending on where you live. If you plan to become an owner-operator at some point in the future, now is a good time to start planning.

 

Start saving money out of each paycheck so you'll have a down-payment on your vehicle. Most people need to finance at least a part of the investment, which means potential lenders will be examining your credit history. The better your credit rating, the better your chances of getting a low-interest loan. As you plan for the future, keep your debt load manageable, pay your bills on time and keep creditors from filing judgments against you.

 

Many owner-operators choose to lease their semi-truck and other equipment instead of buying it directly. Leasing a tractor is like leasing a car or an apartment - you only pay for the property during the time you need to use it. Leasing might allow you to upgrade your equipment more often and get better equipment with less money up-front. There are tax and operating advantages to both leasing and buying - that's the kind of decision an accountant or another experienced owner-operator can help you make.

 

Owner-Operator Companies - When choosing a company to work for as an owner-operator, be sure you understand the work arrangement before you sign on. There are a handful of companies out there who make it extremely hard for their owner-operators to succeed. For example, an employer might require you to lease a truck from their fleet, and they might give you an older truck in terrible condition. Then you will be responsible for maintaining it, and while it is being repaired, you will not be driving or earning money. The Owner-Operator Independent Drivers Association does not recommend leasing equipment from your employer. When you lease through a third-party equipment provider, you can work for different freight companies to balance your workload.

 

The term "forced dispatch" means that, even as an owner operator, if you get a call from a dispatcher requesting you to pick up a load, you have to pick it up. Even if it's your son's birthday party and you promised to spend the weekend at home, turning down a forced dispatch load would mean your stock would drop to nearly nothing at the freight company, and you may spend the next few weeks waiting for a decent load. Although drivers do better when they are flexible and eager to work, you should steer clear of forced-dispatch employers.

 

This section focused on long-haul owner-operators, but there are independent drivers in every type of trucking, including regional, local and delivery.

 

Key Points:

 

Working as an owner-operator gives you the freedom of self-employment. Owner-operators set their own schedules.

 

Having good credit will help you get a good deal on equipment loans.

Leasing from a third-party equipment provider will offer more options for work.

http://www.jobmonkeyjobs.com/cm/trucking_job/owner_operator

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/starting-a-trucking-company-how-to-run-a-trucking-business

 

OWNER OPERATOR

WEEKLY AND MONTHLY BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK /FLATBED / REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

Oregon State business State registry fee ($50.00 two years – Amount paid weekly or monthly = 2 years)

$0.63

$0.63

$0.63

$0.63

$2.50

IRP and IFTA fee ($280.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$5.84

$5.84

$5.84

$5.84

$23.33 

Heavy Vehicle registration fee ($539.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$11.23

 

$11.23

$11.23

$11.23

$44.91

Business Phone Majic Jack ($60.00 div. by 12 for 2016)

$1.25

$1.25

$1.25

$1.25

$5.00

Advertisement

$2.50

$2.50

$2.50

$2.50

$10.00

Internet Load Sites & Internet Truck Stop

$35.00

$35.00

$35.00

$35.00

$140.00

Office Supplies

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$50.00

Cell Phone for Truck/Driver

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$40.00

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer, equipment & Capital

Added later

Added later

Added later

Added

later

Added

later

TOTAL

$78.95

$78.95

$78.95

$78.95

$315.74

 

OWNER OPERATOR

WEEKLY AND MONTHLY TRUCK AND FLATBED / REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

12,000 miles a month - National average of $4.70 per gallon - Tractor trailer fuel mileage of between 7 to 8 miles per gallon.

429 or 500 gallons (7 miles to the gallon) x $4.70 = $2,016.30 or $2,350.00 weekly or $8,065.20 or

$9,400.00 monthly ($24,195.00 or $28,200.00)

$2,350.00

$2,350.00

$2,350.00

$2,350.00

$9,400.00

IFTA FUEL TAX (estimating, based on $12,000.00 miles & tax diesel receipts)

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$200.00

OR Road Tax based on 800 miles driven in OR a week x 4 = 3,200 miles x .1638 OR 1/10 OF 1 CENT PER MILE = 163.8 (78,001 - 80,000)

$131.04

$131.04

$131.04

$131.04

$524.16

Truck Maintenance & Repair (Truck Batteries)

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$200.00

Oil and Fluids (3 to 5,000.00 miles)

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$100.000

Truck Tire replacements for blown tire

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$100.000

Truck & Trailer tires replaced every 60-70,000 miles x 18 every six months

$150.00

$150.00

$150.00

$150.00

$600.00

Truck Liability Insurance

$125.00

$125.00

$125.00

$125.00

$500.00

Monthly Live GPS Tracking with Unlimited Web Access

$4.99

$4.99

$4.99

$4.99

$19.95

Pathway X1 mountable, stationary automatic (Truck and RV) dish tv

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$40.00

Motor Truck Cargo Insurance x 2 trailers

$37.50

$37.50

$37.50

$37.50

$150.00

Trailer Tires & Maintenance

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$25.00

$100.000

TOTAL

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$11,934.11

One Truck and two trailers are insured at $36,000.00 vehicle and trailer values, and truck liability and cargo insurance.

The life of a tire depends on proper maintenance, air pressure, rotation, balancing, vehicle alignment, and even proper lubrication of the 5th wheel (where the trailer connects) steering tires will last about 125,000 miles. Drive and trailer tires about 200,000 miles. Until you begin traveling lots of miles? http://www.answerbag.com/q_view/785432#ixzz3CIs4Ion2

Okay, tread life depends on 1. Obviously how you treat them (like you mentioned) 2. The brand name and 3. More importantly, the SPEED RATING. If you get a name brand tire (Michelin, Toyo, BF Goodrich, Pirelli, Bridgestone, Goodyear, etc.) a T or S rated tire should give you 60-70,000 miles, an H rated 50,000 and a Y or Z rated about 40,000. The higher the speed rating, the softer the rubber, the better it grips the road, the less the life of the tire(s). What size are you looking for? Lower profile tires are almost always a higher speed rating than a T or S. Talk with a tire technician, there is so much more to tires than the size. Good luck. https://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080715084

Cheap commercial truck tire $60.00 to $165.00

http://www.alibaba.com/showroom/commercial-truck-tire-prices.html

New listing 8 tires BOTO BT556 295/75R22.5 semi truck tires 295-75 22.5 22.5 tires

$2,624.00

New listing 8 tires Roadmaster RM275 11R24.5 semi truck tires 11245 22.5 24.5 tires

$3,104.00

8 tires Firestone T831 - 11R22.5 16 ply semi truck tires 22.5 tire 11r225 11225

$4,368.00

8 tires BOTO BT669 trailer tire 295/75R22.5 semi truck tires 295-75 22.5 22.5

$2,312.00

New Recap Tire Low Profile R 22.5 CSD2 Semi Truck 295 75 LP Retread Volvo 3412

$225.00

2 MICHELIN XDS 2 225 70 19.5 HEAVY DUTY TRUCK TIRES BRAND NEW PAIR TOW TRACTOR G - $799.95

Wide Based Super Single Semi Truck Tires & Wheels, 445/50/22.5

New listing Wide Based Super Single Semi Truck Tires & Wheels, 445/50/22.5

$2,000.00

Tires are very expensive yet there are many options but 144,000 miles safe driving miles is the goal at all times, so $400.00 a tire x 18 every six months = $7,200.00 you must save over a twelve month period in addition to monthly tire mishaps. Tire replacement is based on the sixth month and second year beginning of business traveling $144,000.00 miles annually.

Total miles ran, divided by gallons purchased. This gives the average MPG for quarter. Then that mpg times miles run in each state. This gives you gallons burned in each state. Then each state multiplies gallons burned by their tax rate. The gives you total owed per state you ran in. All states are then totaled. This gives you amount owed in fuel tax for quarter. All state fuel taxes paid at the pump are totaled. This gives you the total state fuel taxes paid at the pump. The fuel tax paid is subtracted from fuel tax owed. This gives you the amount you still owe, or the amount they owe you if you over paid. Note: $200.00 monthly is estimated, totally depends on how much taxes you pay for diesel in each state. You could get a credit for example.

 

OWNER OPERATOR

WEEKLY AND MONTHLY BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK/FLATBED/REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

TOTAL

$78.95

$78.95

$78.95

$78.95

$315.74

WEEKLY AND MONTHLY TRUCK AND FLATBED / REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

TOTAL

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$2,983.53

$11,934.11

TOTAL

$3,062.48

$3,062.48

$3,062.48

$3,062.48

$12,249.85

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer, equipment & Capital

$200.00

$200.00

$200.00

$200.00

$800.00

TOTAL

$3,262.48

$3,262.48

$3,262.48

$3,262.48

$13,049.85

 

WEEKLY REFER EXPENSES RATHER THEN FLATBED

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

Refer Gasoline

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$272.00

Refer Trailer fridge motor oil change & Maintenance

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$50.00

TOTAL

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$322.00

REFER INVOICES ARE HIGHIER THEN FLATBED OR DRY VAN

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/truckingindustryforum/refrigerated-trucking-forum/170825-cost-per-mile-ton-run-reefer.html

Refer Gasoline - 50 gal. tank and usually use around 13-17 gal, per 24 hrs depending on conditions and product like produce needs continues but typical frozen foods can run on start stop mode extending the length of how much fuel it burns – 17 gallons x $4.00 a gal. - $68.00 daily x 5 days =

 

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY AND THREE MONTHS BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK / FLATBED /REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

1st Month

2nd Month

3rd Month

Three Months Expenses

Oregon State business State registry fee (two years – Amount paid monthly = 2 years)

$50.00

$2.50

$2.50

$2.50

$7.50

MC#; DOT3 and BOC-3 (1 time fee)

$399.00

-

-

-

-

IRP and IFTA fee ($280.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$280.00

$23.33 

$23.33 

$23.33 

$69.99

Heavy Vehicle registration fee ($539.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$539.00

$44.91

$44.91

$44.91

$134.73

Business Phone Majic Jack ($60.00 div. by 12 for 2016)

$60.00

$5.00

$5.00

$5.00

$15.00

Advertisement

$200.00

$10.00

$10.00

$10.00

$30.00

Internet Load Sites & Internet Truck Stop

-

$140.00

$140.00

$140.00

$420.00

Office Supplies

$200.00

$50.00

$50.00

$50.00

$150.00

Cell Phone for Truck/Driver

$100.00

$40.00

$40.00

$40.00

$120.00

PC*MILER

$300.00

-

-

-

-

Freight Software

$200.00

 

-

-

-

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer, equipment & Capital

Added later

Added later

Added later

Added

later

Added

later

TOTAL

$2,328.00

$315.74

$315.74

$315.74

$947.22

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY AND THREE MONTHS TRUCK AND FLATBED /REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

1st Month

2nd Month

3rd Month

Three Months Expenses

12,000 miles a month - National average of $4.70 per gallon - Tractor trailer fuel mileage of between 7 to 8 miles per gallon.

429 or 500 gallons (7 miles to the gallon) x $4.70 = $2,016.30 or $2,350.00 weekly or $8,065.20 or

$9,400.00 monthly ($24,195.00 or $28,200.00)

-

$9,400.00

$9,400.00

$9,400.00

$28,200.00

IFTA FUEL TAX (estimating, based on $12,000.00 miles & tax diesel receipts)

-

$200.00

$200.00

$200.00

$600.00

OR Road Tax based on 4,800 miles driven in OR X .1638 OR 1/10 OF 1 CENT PER MILE = 163.8 (78,001 - 80,000)

-

$524.16

$524.16

$524.16

$1,572.48

Truck Maintenance & Repair (Truck Batteries)

$1,000.00

$200.00

$200.00

$200.00

$600.00

Oil and Fluids (3 to 5,000.00 miles)

$100.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.000

$300.00

Truck Tire replacements for blown tire

$500.00

$100.00

$100.00

$100.000

$300.00

Truck & Trailer tires replaced every 60 - 70,000 miles x 18 (six months)

N/A

$600.00

$600.00

$600.00

$600.00

Truck Liability Insurance

$1,500.00

$500.00

$500.00

$500.00

$1,500.00

Live GPS Tracking with Unlimited Web Access

$159.00

$19.95

$19.95

$19.95

$59.85

Pathway X1 mountable, stationary automatic (Truck and RV) dish tv

$700.00

$40.00

$40.00

$40.00

$120.00

Motor Truck Cargo Insurance x 2 trailers

$1,000.00

$150.00

$150.00

$150.00

$450.00

Trailer Maintenance

-

$100.000

$100.000

$100.000

$300.00

TOTAL

$4,959.00

$11,934.11

$11,934.11

$11,934.11

$34,602.33

One Truck and two trailers are insured at $36,000.00 vehicle and trailer values, and truck liability and cargo insurance.

 

TRUCK/FLATBED/REFER PURCHASE AND EXPENSES

Description

Equipment Cost

TOTAL

You Decide

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY AND THREE MONTHS BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK / FLATBED / REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

1st Month

2nd Month

3rd Month

Three Months Expenses

TOTAL

$2,328.00

$315.74

$315.74

$315.74

$947.22

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY AND THREE MONTHS TRUCK AND FLATBED /REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

TOTAL

$4,959.00

$11,934.11

$11,934.11

$11,934.11

$34,602.33

COMBINED TOTAL

$7,287.00

$12,249.85

$12,249.85

$12,249.85

$35,549.55

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer, equipment & Capital

$+36,000.00

(Capital)

Loan pay

$800.00

$800.00

$800.00

$2,400.00

TOTAL

$43,287.00

$12,624.85

$12,624.85

$12,624.85

$37,049.55

 

WEEKLY REFER EXPENSES RATHER THEN FLATBED

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

Refer Gasoline

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$272.00

Refer Trailer fridge motor oil change & Maintenance

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$50.00

TOTAL

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$322.00

REFER INVOICES ARE HIGHIER THEN FLATBED OR DRY VAN

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/truckingindustryforum/refrigerated-trucking-forum/170825-cost-per-mile-ton-run-reefer.html

Refer Gasoline - 50 gal. tank and usually use around 13-17 gal, per 24 hrs depending on conditions and product like produce needs continues but typical frozen foods can run on start stop mode extending the length of how much fuel it burns – 17 gallons x $4.00 a gal. - $68.00 daily x 5 days =

 

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY, THREE MONTHS, TWELVE MONTHS AND PER MILE BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK / FLATBED / REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

Cost

1st Month

Three Months Expenses

12 Months Expenses

Per Mile Cost

Oregon State business State registry fee (two years – Amount paid monthly = 2 years)

$50.00

$2.50

$7.50

$30.00

.0025

MC#; DOT3 and BOC-3 (1 time fee)

$399.00

-

-

-

-

IRP and IFTA fee ($280.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$280.00

$23.33 

$69.99

$280.00

.0020

Heavy Vehicle registration fee ($539.00 div. 12 for 2016)

$539.00

$44.91

$134.73

$539.00

.0038

 

Business Phone Majic Jack ($60.00 div. by 12 for 2016)

$60.00

$5.00

$15.00

$60.00

.0005

Advertisement

$200.00

$10.00

$30.00

$120.00

.0010

Internet Load Sites & Internet Truck Stop

-

$140.00

$420.00

$1,680.00

.0116

Office Supplies

$200.00

$50.00

$150.00

$600.00

.0042

Cell Phone for Truck/Driver

$100.00

$40.00

$120.00

$480.00

.0033

PC*MILER

$300.00

-

-

-

-

Freight Software

$200.00

-

-

-

-

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer & Equipment

Added later

Added later

Added later

Added later

 

TOTAL

$2,328.00

$315.74

$947.22

$3,789.00

.0289

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY, THREE MONTHS, TWELVE MONTHS AND PER MILE TRUCK AND FLATBED / REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

Cost

1st Month

Three Months Expenses

12 Months Expenses

Per Mile Cost

12,000 miles a month - National average of $4.70 per gallon - Tractor trailer fuel mileage of between 7 to 8 miles per gallon. 429 or 500 gallons (7 miles to the gallon) x $4.70 = $2,016.30 - $2,350.00 weekly or $8,065.20 -

$9,400.00 monthly ($24,195.00 - 28,200.00)

-

$9,400.00

$28,200.00

$112,800.00

.7833

IFTA FUEL TAX (estimating, based on $12,000.00 miles & tax diesel receipts)

-

$200.00

$600.00

$2,400.00

.0166

 

OR Road Tax based on 4,800 miles driven in OR X .1638 OR 1/10 OF 1 CENT PER MILE = 163.8 (78,001 - 80,000)

-

$524.16

$1,572.48

$6,289.92

.0443

Truck Maintenance & Repair (Truck Batteries)

$1,000.00

$200.00

$600.00

$2,400.00

.0166

Oil and Fluids (3 to 5,000.00 miles)

$100.00

$100.00

$300.00

$1,200.00

.0083

Truck Tire replacements for blown tire

$500.00

$100.00

$300.00

$1,200.00

.0083

Truck & Trailer tires replaced every 60 - 70,000 miles x 18 (six months)

N/A

$600.00

$1,800.00

$7,200.00

.05

Truck Liability Insurance

$1,500.00

$500.00

$1,500.00

$6,000.00

.0416

Monthly Live GPS Tracking with Unlimited Web Access

$159.00

$19.95

$59.85

$239.40

.0017

Mo Motor Truck Cargo Insurance x 2 trailers

$1,000.00

$150.00

$450.00

$1,800.00

.0125

 

Pathway X1 mountable, stationary automatic (Truck and RV) dish tv

$700.00

$40.00

$120.00

$480.00

.0033

Trailer Maintenance

-

$100.000

$300.00

$1,200.00

.0083

TOTAL

$4,959.00

$11,934.11

$35,802.33

$143,209.32

.99

 

TRUCK/FLATBED/REFER PURCHASE AND EXPENSES

Description

Equipment Cost

TOTAL

You Decide

 

OWNER OPERATOR

START UP COST, MONTHLY, THREE MONTHS, TWELVE MONTHS AND PER MILE BUSINESS EXPENSES OPERATING A TRUCK/FLATBED/REFER TRAILER DRIVING 12,000 MILES

Description

Start Up

Cost

1st Month

Three Months Expenses

12 Months Expenses

Per Mile Cost

TOTAL

$2,328.00

$315.74

$947.22

$3,789.00

.0289

START UP COST, MONTHLY, THREE MONTHS, TWELVE MONTHS AND PER MILE TRUCK AND FLATBED/REFER EXPENSES DRIVING 12,000 MILES

TOTAL

$4,959.00

$11,934.11

$35,802.33

$143,209.32

.99

COMBINED TOTAL

$7,287.00

$12,249.85

$35,549.55

$146,998.20

$1.02

Business Loan for Truck, Trailer, equipment & Capital

$+36,000.00

(Capital)

Loan pay

$800.00

$2,400.00

$9,600.00

$.08

TOTAL

$43,287.00

$13,049.85

$37,949.55

$156,598.20

$1.10

 

WEEKLY REFER EXPENSES RATHER THEN FLATBED

Description

1st Week

2nd Week

3rd Week

4th Week

Monthly  Expenses

Refer Gasoline

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$68.00

$272.00

Refer Trailer fridge motor oil change & Maintenance

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$12.50

$50.00

TOTAL

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$80.50

$322.00

REFER INVOICES ARE HIGHIER THEN FLATBED OR DRY VAN

http://www.thetruckersreport.com/truckingindustryforum/refrigerated-trucking-forum/170825-cost-per-mile-ton-run-reefer.html

Refer Gasoline - 50 gal. tank and usually use around 13-17 gal, per 24 hrs depending on conditions and product like produce needs continues but typical frozen foods can run on start stop mode extending the length of how much fuel it burns – 17 gallons x $4.00 a gal. - $68.00 daily x 5 days =

 

 

Owner Operator Salary operating one truck and flatbed trailer less disability/health insurance and OR Road Tax, equals $.32 per mile revenue and does not include a $1,500.00 monthly loan payment for $100,000.00 over ten years hopefully or less borrowed if you can, with $? going to equipment, Start Up cost, $7,887.00 Business Cost and at least $36,441.50 set aside for Business expenses within the first two months.

 

Truck deprecation and loan payment for $100,000.00 is not included in the final $.32 per mile revenue nor does the Refer expenses that follow, although Refer loads pay $.10 to $.20 per load more, and then you must pay Uncle Sam taxes for working your self very hard.

 

$12,249.85 – Owner Operator Business and Truck expenses home based in Oregon with                                  

                      Operating a semi truck, flatbed and refer insured - $1.03/4 per mile.

$15,600.00 – Total revenue ($3,900.00 x 4 = $15,600.00) - $1.30 per mile.

$3,350.15 –   Owner Operator Business and Truck Revenue after all Business Expenses

                      home based in Oregon operating a semi truck, flatbed or refer insured –

                      $.28 per mile.

$+524.16 –    OR ROAD TAX – If you are not home based in Oregon then don’t visit

                      and save money - .1638 x 12,000 miles = $524.16 or 163.8 (1/10 of a cent

                      per mile).

$11,725.69 – Revised Truck expenses operating one truck and flatbed - $.98 per mile.

$15,600.00 – Total revenue ($3,900.00 x 4 = $15,600.00) - $1.36 per mile

$3,874.31 –   Owner Operator Business and Truck Revenue after all Business Expenses

                      home based in Oregon operating a semi truck, flatbed and refer insured –

                      $.32 per mile.

 

Ending expenses involve disability and health and dental insurances and retirement pension, maybe social security tax on you, financed tractor and equipment with holdings and payments to protect your future and life insurance, leaving maybe $3,000.00

Revenue if you can spend $40,000 for an $800.00 payment.

 

Long haul trucking is a single persons retreat from mortgages and vehicle payments, but a motorcycle stashed or maybe a jeep and or boat payment could be realistic.

 

You must consider the cost of a house, maybe $1,000.00 or more a month or a one room apartment for $650.00.

 

Then there are your utilities, waste removal services or sanitation services, theft when you’re gone. No thinks, drive or stay off the road. Know one says you must drive for ever but a few years, when you’re still young enough to climb up into the seat, save some money a long the way, buy some toys to enjoy one day and be happy, because everything is what you make it. If you want to be reckless and Ya Hooish, spend you’re money on booze and liquor or sex and drugs, then I hope you don’t go long haul trucking to often.

 

For me, $3,000.00 a month clear less my personal expenses not living out of restaurants, insurances, etc., means I would be able to save $12,000.00 a year rather easy and still have bucks left for a $400.00 combined disability, health and dental insurance plan and policy guaranteeing self employed disability insurance premiums paid monthly to you in case of an accident. With an $800.00 payment on a tractor and trailer, a $40,000.00 package deal with a truck with low miles on the engine, tyranny and rear end. $3,874.31 less $1,200.00 equals $2,674.31 less a $1,000.00 payment a month for savings equals $1,674.31 a month for food, cloths and toy payments or storage building payment, phone, internet and cable tv onboard the truck of course.

 

Lot better then joining the Armed Forces, of course the obstacles of obtaining your CDL and coming up with your business capital, at least two to three months of business expenses and maybe factoring at first or for protection of not being paid.

 

Bottom line, if you are disciplined you can build a savings over a five year period, eventually after a few years you can park your rig and go to work for VIP Wages.

 

How you eat on the road, maybe juicing, or fruits and vegetables or maybe you prefer hot meals; well you give yourself a daily premium and have a portable camp stove with an onboard generator rather then using a propane bottle for fuel to cook with.

 

That’s why I say take ten hours a day off in between to 7 hour work shifts each day. If you can’t live on $1,500.00 a month for food, make your own hot dogs and burgers for pâté sake.

 

Calculations:

 

1. Calculate the mileage between the starting and destination points. For this example, the trip begins in Atlanta and ends in Miami.

 

2. Divide the overall rate by the number of miles from the start to destination. The rate in this case is $3,100, and the mileage between Atlanta and Miami is 680 (3,100 / 680 = 4.56). The per-mile rate is $4.56.

 

3. Calculate the cost of transporting the load. On average, the truck gets 5.5 mpg. The truck will use 123 gallons of diesel for the 680-mile trip, and $3 is the cost per gallon of diesel (123 x 3 = 369). The transportation cost is $369.

 

4. Multiply the truck driver's hourly rate by the length of time needed to complete the trip. The truck averages 60 mph. The 680-mile trip will take about 11 hours (680 / 60 = 11.33). If the driver pay rate is $12 per hour, the cost for the driver is $132 (11 x 12 = 132).

 

5. Add the gas cost and the truck driver pay ($369 + $132 = $501).

 

6. Divide the total cost of the trip by the number of miles in the trip (501 / 680 = 73.7). The cost of the trip is 74 cents per mile.

 

7. Subtract the per-mile cost of the trip from the per-mile rate to arrive at the per-mile profit of the trip ($4.56 - $0.74 = $3.82). The per-mile profit is $3.82.

http://www.ehow.com/how_7467256_calculate-trucking-rates.html

 

Figuring Cost Per Mile: Miles driven divided by MPG = gallons used. Gallons used multiplied by price per gallon = total price spent for miles driven. Total cost divided into total miles = cost per mile. http://www.ooida.com/EducationTools/Tools/costpermile.asp